Show 261 Friday 19 January

Watch today’s show at YouTube.

Hi, I’m Sarah. Welcome to The Daily English Show.

Today’s key word are: undies and togs.
Undies is short for underwear.

The different names of underwear is quite interesting I think. For example, in New Zealand what we call a G string is called a thong in some other English speaking countries and in Japan it’s called a T back.
Tバックcomes from T-back because it looks like a t. It’s kind of funny because the pronunciation is almost the same as the one for tea bag.

I think in America the word panties is common for female underwear. But in NZ the word panties isn’t common.

As for the word pants – well in England that means undies and in America it means trousers, in NZ trousers, and in Japan – the same as England: undies.

Mmm confusing.

Togs are things you wear when you’re swimming. Also called in other countries: swimsuit, swimmers, bathing suit, bathers, aqua jammies, swimming costume, cozzie.

I thought togs was used only in NZ – but according to Wikipedia it’s also used in some parts of Australia.

Today’s show is the final in the introducing kiwi ads series.
Today’s ad asks the question: How far away from the beach do togs become undies?

And their answer is: If you can’t see the water, you’re in underpants.
Local supermarkets, pedestrian crossings, office buildings, public transport.
Anywhere more than 300 meters from the water’s edge – all underpant transformation areas.

There’s one word in this ad that I’d never heard of before. It’s budgie smugglers. This is another word for Speedos. Speedos are a style of togs for men that are like undies – they’re not that popular in NZ.
I just read the Wikipedia article on Speedos and it says that as well. It says they’re not popular in NZ and North America – but they’re popular in Asia, South America, Europe and Australia.

So please check that ad out. It’s a great way to remember today’s two key words: undies and togs.

STICK NEWS

Kia ora, this is Stick News. Last week a woman in California died after entered a competition to win a Nintendo Wii. Her family is now suing the radio station who held the competition.

A Nintendo Wii is a machine to play video games.
The company said they chose the name because “Wii sounds like ‘we’, (which emphasizes that the console is for everyone).”
Wii does indeed sound like we – it also sounds like wee – which is a noun meaning urine and a verb meaning to urinate.
A Californian radio station decided to hold a competition called “ Hold your wee for a Wii.”
The winner was the person who could keep drinking water without going to the toilet. After the competition one contestant died. It is thought she died from water intoxication.
Her family is now going to sue the radio station.

And that was Stick News for Friday the 19th of January.
Kia Ora.

the snow report

This is all the snow piled up along the side of the house.

conversations with sarah
#158 Do many people die like that?

Step 1: Repeat Jim’s lines.
Step 2: Read Jim’s lines and talk to Sarah.

Jim Did you know that you can die of water intoxication?

Sarah Yeah, I did. When you take drugs like e – you have to be careful not to drink too much water.

Jim Do many people die like that?

Sarah I don’t think so – but there’ve been a few famous cases.

Jim How much water did they drink?

Sarah This English girl drank 7 litres of water in 90 minutes.

Jim 7 litres? Wow.

Links

Today’s news.

Watch the ad here.

Script:

How far away from the beach do togs become undies?
Skin tight swimming togs: an item of clothing you’d happily wear in public, but not in public.
So how far is too far? Let’s begin.
Togs, togs, togs, togs, togs, togs, togs, togs, togs, togs, undies.
Undies, undies, undies, undies.

If you can’t see the water, you’re in underpants.
Local supermarkets, pedestrian crossings, office buildings, public transport.
Anywhere more than 300 meters from the water’s edge – all underpant transformation areas.
If we treat the budgie smuggler with respect – undies, undies, undies, togs –
everyone wins.

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