Show 264 Monday 22 January

Watch today’s show at YouTube.

Hi, I’m Sarah. Welcome to The Daily English Show.
Back in October – for a week … from show number 166 – I talked about watching videos which teach other languages in English.
I introduced some videos in which people were teaching: Italian, Indonesian, German and Japanese.

Well, I’m going to do the same this week.
Today: Portugese.

This is what Wikipedia says:
Portuguese is a Romance language that originated in what is today Galicia (Spain) and northern Portugal.
It is the official language of these places:
Angola
Brazil
Cape Verde
Guinea-Bissau
Mozambique
Portugal
São Tomé and Príncipe
And co-official language of these places: Macau and Tetum in East Timor.

This is a map from Wikipedia of the places where Portuguese is spoken in the world.

Portuguese is ranked fifth among the world’s languages in number of native speakers.
There’s over 200 million (I made a mistake and said 2 million).
So if you learn Portuguese you can make a lot of friends. Cool.

By the way Romance languages are the ones that came from Latin.
English isn’t a Romance language. It’s Germanic.
Here’s a diagram from Wikipedia of the Romance languages.

A YouTuber from Brazil called kopkitty made a video called lesson and she teaches some Portugese.

I’m going to try and say two of the phrases she teaches in that video.

Firstly: hi, how are you?
Oi, tudo bem?

Next: I’m doing fine, thank you.
Eu estou bem, obrigada.

If you want to learn any more – go and watch that video.
She also teaches:
Please, thank you, how much is it?, it’s delicious, goodbye.

One funny thing is that she is Brazilian so her native language is Portuguese – but her English is really good so from reading the comments you can see that a lot of people actually think that she’s a native English speaker learning Portuguese.

So… hi, kopkitty. And thanks for the lesson!

STICK NEWS

Kia ora, this is Stick News. The TV program responsible for the latest short-lived natto boom in Japan may soon be axed after it was found that the “facts” they broadcast about the natto diet were in fact lies.

「あるある大事典2」 Aru Aru Daijiten II is on TV in Japan every Sunday night at 9pm.
According to the show’s website: It’s an entertaining variety show that examines various tips on “body”, “mind”, and “daily life”. The show provides us with useful and easy-to-understand information based on scientific data, making us enjoy our lives more comfortably.
Well the information may be easy-to-understand and the person presenting the “data” may be wearing a white coat … but this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s true.
On the 7th of January the show said that eating natto makes you lose weight.
Thousands of people immediately rushed out and bought natto, causing a nation-wide natto boom.
But it turns out the show lied. They made up the data, the comments from a US professor and they used photographs of people who weren’t actually on a natto diet.

Mountains of uneaten natto is now sitting in supermarkets and natto factories all over the country.
The show’s only sponsor has cancelled its sponsorship and the show itself may be cancelled.
That was Stick News for Monday the 22nd of January.
Kia Ora.

the snow report

Check out these icicles on the local supermarket. Very cool.

conversations with sarah
#159 Have you ever been to Brazil?

Step 1: Repeat Jane’s lines.
Step 2: Read Jane’s lines and talk to Sarah.

Sarah Have you ever been to Brazil?

Jane No. Have you?

Sarah No, I haven’t. But I met lots of Brazilians when I was in Aichi.

Jane Really? Why? Do a lot of Brazilians live there?

Sarah Yeah. And when I first came to Japan I took some lessons at a church for a while and all the other students were Brazilian.

Jane Was the lesson in Portuguese?

Sarah A mixture of Portuguese and Japanese… so I pretty much couldn’t understand anything. It was pretty funny.

Jane Why did you study at a church?

Sarah Because it was close to my house and it was cheap. And I was broke.

Links:

Today’s news here or here.

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